Nandor Glid

Serbia

Biography

Nandor Glid was born on December 12, 1924, in Subotica, in an orthodox Jewish family. There he finished elementary school. He abandoned the High school after three years and devoted himself to stonecutting craft. This gave him an opportunity to work with stone and to realize that his aspiration was to create. But soon the war broke out. His whole family perished in Auschwitz. The only one who survived was his sister. Glid himself was driven to forced labor in Segedin. When he, with a group of young Jews from Subotica, succeeded to get free and return to Subotica, they all realized that none of their close relatives was alive. They joined the partisans and went to fight. Soon Glid was seriously wounded. In 1945 he arrived in Belgrade and there began his artistic education. He graduated from the Academy of Applied Arts in 1951 as the first generation of the students from the Academy, and already in 1948, he was awarded the First prize for sculpture at the exhibition of the Academy‘s students. Since then he had been developing his art and for most of his works, he won awards and competitions in Yugoslavia and abroad. Glid was an exceptionally good portraitist, excellent in his graphic art, but his work on the commemorative sculptures bears the best witness about him, his artistic accomplishments, as well as about our times. The first monument based on his sculptures was one in Jarondol, in 1951, after which the monuments in Zavala in Trebinje followed. In the 1957 competition for the monument to Yugoslav victims of the Mauthausen concentration camp, Glid was awarded the first prize. In the international competition for a monument to the victims of the Dachau concentration camp, Glid was again awarded first prize and this monument was built in 1959. A version of this monument was built in 1979 in the park of the Yad Vashem Museum in Jerusalem. In Italy, his monuments stand in Gonares and Sansepolcro. In Yugoslavia, Glid continued with a series of impressive monuments as “Ballad of the Hanged” built in 1967, in Subotica, and “Hundred for One” in 1980, in Šumarice. One of the most beautiful monuments was built in 1990 on the Danube bank in Belgrade. It is “Menorah in Flame”, the monument to victims of the Nazi genocide in Belgrade. His sculpture “The Pit” stands in the Sachsenhausen Museum.

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Nandor_Glid

Photo gallery

July 1991




Symposium Terra 1991 - artists


Nandor Glid

Serbia

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Olga Jevrić

Srbija

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